From Two to One: Teaching about Non-Dualism in a World Religions Class

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This entry shares my experience teaching about non-dualism to grade 9 World Religions students. To my surprise, the class found the concept to be both understandable at a basic level and yet enticingly profound in its ability to transform our perceptions of reality. Our study culminated in a sharing of our artwork as part of an epic journey to oneness, performed before high school students and teachers in a Community Gathering.

Introduction

“Religion has only one job description: how to make the one out of the two.”

- Richard Rohr, Immortal Diamond: The Search for the True Self, p. 100.

Can grade nine World Religions students really understand the concept of non-dualism? I knew I had a very capable class, but I wondered if my expectations far exceeded what was possible, given that I myself had struggled with this concept only some months before. However, my colleague Richard Friedericks and I were searching for a ‘big idea’ that we could turn into a Community Gathering for the entire high school community. Non-dualism had not only become personally compelling to my own journey, but something that I thought that my international school students in this East-meets-West city of Hong Kong might find attractive. Charmain's dualism paintingOur class had been studying Hinduism and Buddhism, and were transitioning to Judaism soon. One of my students, Charmaine, had recently drawn a beautiful painting of light and dark duality during a previous spiritual practice assignment that sparked the idea that perhaps our class could take on the topic of finding a way to overcome duality.  Knowing that I had a core of artsy kids in the class, I took them to the art room one day to experiment with the possibilities of creating a series of murals about dualities that we experience daily in our lives. However, before moving to the activity itself, understanding how I came to even consider teaching this concept requires some background of my own recent interest in this topic.

Understanding Dualism and Non-dualism

Since I had begun practicing a form of Christian meditation called Centering Prayer over the last 9 months, I had been thinking a great deal about the concepts of dualism and non-dualism. Through reading about and doing this spiritual practice, I was coming to see dualism in many aspects of my daily life. On a moment-by-moment basis, I realized that I saw life through the lens of preferred “likes” and to-be-avoided “dislikes.” Tonight I prefer wine for dinner rather than water; I’d rather have a quiet Lebanese lunch with my wife on Saturday than make an appointment to see the dentist; or, going to frigid Beijing for Christmas seemed more to my liking than taking the family to a Thai beach resort. This same dualistic tendency had its social and workplace correlates: I’d rather sit with this person for lunch than that person; it’s important for me to demonstrate my knowledge during a school meeting, so as to avoid appearing incompetent. When our class visited a Buddhist monk on a field trip and asked him to comment on non-dualism, we learned about the “Eight Worldly Concerns,” which can be summarized simply in this way (Bond, 2005). Do not be attached to:DSC_2765

  1. Getting and keeping material objects
  2. Praise and encouragement.
  3. A good reputation.
  4. Pleasures of the senses

Do not fear:

  1. Losing or being separated from material objects.
  2. Being blamed, ridiculed, and criticized.
  3. Gaining a bad reputation.
  4. Unpleasant experiences.

DSC_2766I was particularly struck that the monk explained that we should not seek for riches, nor fear losing money. Underneath the impressive work ethic of my mostly Asian students was a fear that if they didn’t work hard, they would end up as a “beggar,” as I heard some Chinese people say to their children.  And I had to admit that for all my rhetoric of being a Christian teacher, something I am sincerely committed to, I could find within myself the same fear of not having enough money. Hearing a monk, who lived in one of the world’s most expensive cities with no salary and could not even claim to own the robes that is his daily dress, share these truths revealed to me the veracity of the Buddhist claim that suffering is caused by desire.

My colleague Richard shared with me an insightful reading from American philosopher Ken Wilber, who expands upon these themes in his book No Boundaries. He explains that religions across the globe suggest that: boundaryMost of our “problems of living,” then, are based on the illusion that the opposites can and should be separated and isolated from one another . . .  Liberation is not freedom from the negative, but freedom from the pairs altogether . . . In Western terms, the discovery of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth [is] . . .  the state of realizing “no opposites” and “not-two-ness (p. 27).”

These concepts were echoed from within my own tradition by Episcopalian priest Cynthia Bourgeault, the woman who had inspired my Centering Prayer practice. A leitmotif running through her book on Centering Prayer was the supposition that dualistic thinking results in a differentiated, egoic sense of self: boundaryThe subject/object polarity built into the way the mind works sets up the impression of “having” a distinct identity, informed by certain attributes and imbued with certain gifts that need to become fully expressed if my personhood is to be whole. That sets up a great deal of expectation – and also a good deal of anxiety (2004, p. 10-11). Fraught with expectation and anxiety, this ordinary awareness, as Bourgeault calls it, seemed to get at the core of the human problem: we need to compete with others to get what we need to find the satisfaction that we were created for. Bourgeault suggests that the way out of this conundrum is a spiritual awareness that transcends the self/other polarity:

The big difference between them is that whereas ordinary awareness perceives self-reflexive consciousness, which splits the world into subject and object; spiritual awareness perceives through an intuitive grasp of the whole and an innate sense of belonging . . . and since spiritual awareness is perception based on harmony, the sense of selfhood arising out of it is not plagued by that sense of isolation and anxiety that dominates life at the ordinary level of awareness (p. 12).

Bourgeault warns that dualism can drive a harmful “spiritual acquisitiveness” (p. 50):

It appears that we “have” spiritual experiences, which then contribute to “our” insight, illumination, and eventually full enlightenment. From this perspective, more is better, and enlightenment is quantitative: when we’ve acquired “enough” silence, stability, concentration, spiritual experience, we will emerge into the final stage of our human personhood, traditionally the “unitive” stage, or “transforming union.”  But the trap in this scenario is that dualistic-based selfhood cannot possibly attain unitive consciousness. It’s oxymoron, like a two-wheeled tricycle . . . . To arrive at this unified whole, there is only one route to get there, and it is known to all the spiritual traditions of the world: dying to self (pp. 48-49). 

In her most mystical description, Bourgeault describes the goal of Christian non-dualism:

At this [unitive] stage one is fully using those more subtle perceptivities of spiritual awareness . . . to see and taste the presence of the divine as it moves fully in and out of everything.  It is not “unitive” simply in the sense of dissolving the multiplicity back into a One, but in the sense of seeing the One beautifully and radiantly illuminating the multiplicity, like light pouring through a stained-glass window, present in both the unity and the diversity. This is the particular genius of the Christian path: the ability to see – to really see – the particularity and apparent duality of this world not as an illusion, but rather, as a crucible in which the most tender and intimate particularity of the divine heart becomes fully manifest. At the unitive level Christianity is “all heart” – and in this unitive seeing, deeply mystical and poetic, Christianity becomes radiant with the flame of its own innermost truth, like the bush that burns but is not consumed (p. 72-73).

These were inspiring words that I could not easily or fully explain, but they seemed to beckon me personally. How could I share something of this mystery with my students?

The clearest example of non-dualism that the students could relate to was Jesus’ famous comment from the Sermon on the Mount:

And Jesus said: “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ 44 But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous” (Matthew 5:43-45)

Whereas people often view others through the binary lens of friends or enemies, Jesus suggests a spiritual awareness that loves all, including one’s enemies. While Jesus acknowledges that both friends and enemies exist, he advises a spiritual awareness that views both through the lens of love. Then Jesus goes further, making the radical ontological statement that such love is based on the assumption that God, the source of all goodness, causes his sun to rise and rain to fall upon those who are evil as well as the good. Followers of God, Jesus asserts, should do likewise. By extension, Cynthia believes that the essence of Jesus’ teachings was to find a unity beyond the many pairs of opposites of his day – heaven and earth, justice and mercy, rich and poor, clean and unclean, male and female, and Jew and Gentile. With these ideas in mind, I decided to present dualism and non-dualism to my students and see if we could create a Community Gathering out of these concepts.

Introducing Duality and Non-Duality to My Class

I took the class to the art room and introduced the project.  Using terms we had employed previously, I explained that my working assumption for this project was that all religions suggest that the path from samsara/desire/sin to moksha/nirvana/salvation involves overcoming dualism and moving to a non-dualistic perspective. I then gave some possible dualistic tendencies that are present in our school/world:

  • I like vs. I don’t like
  • Rich and poor
  • Youth and old age
  • Life and death
  • Beautiful and ugly
  • Good and evil
  • Pleasure and pain
  • Freedom and slavery
  • Western and Asian
  • Food and hunger
  • Overweight and underweight
  • HKIS bubble and real Asia
  • Honor student and weak student
  • Ivy League and Community College
  • You and me

I then used a quote from Ken Wilber’s No Boundary to explain the problem of dualism: Ken. . . [E]very boundary line is also a potential battle line, so that just to draw a boundary is to prepare oneself for conflict. Specifically, the conflict of the war of opposites, the agonizing fight of life against death, pleasure against pain, good against evil . . . . “Where to draw the line?” really means, “Where the battle is to take place.” The simple fact is that we live in a world of conflict and opposites because we live in a world of boundaries (p. 20). As described above, I then read Jesus’ wise saying about loving one’s enemies. I explained that conventionally we all divide the world in to “friends” and “enemies,” but that Jesus was letting us in on a great religious truth: progress on the spiritual path means transcending such dichotomies.

To make the case that non-dualism occurs cross-culturally, I also shared the humorous Taoist story about a Chinese farmer, put in the first person:

I am a poor farmer in China, but I had one useful possession – a horse. One day the horse ran away, and my neighbors came to console him over my terrible loss. But I said to them, “What makes you think it is so terrible?” A month later, the horse came home–this time bringing with her two beautiful wild horses. The neighbors became excited at the my good fortune. Such lovely strong horses! But I said to them, “What makes you think this is good fortune?” Soon after my son was thrown from one of the wild horses and broke his leg. All the neighbors were very distressed. Such bad luck! But I said to them, “What makes you think it is bad?” A war came, and every able-bodied man was conscripted and sent into battle. Only my son, because he had a broken leg, remained. The neighbors congratulated the farmer. “What makes you think this is good?” I asked.

The farmer recognizes that he doesn’t know whether a particular outcome is truly “good” or “bad.” Through his non-attachment he develops a sense of equanimity. This Taoist story provided a useful metaphor of non-duality.

DSC_2741Finally, I introduced the possibility that we could share this concept of moving from dualism to non-dualism through a Community Gathering, a once-a-month event in which meaningful stories and/or spiritual concepts are shared in the gym with all 850 high school students and faculty. I suggested that we would draw DSC_274612 murals of dualism from the list above, and that their immediate task was to choose a pairs of opposites and portray the “positive” pole triumphing over the “negative” pole. Before working on the individual murals, we put them on the floor in 3 rows of 4 murals each, and drew a circle through them. With the exception of the two center pieces, all the panels then had an arc running through them. During the Community Gathering, then, all the individual panels would be brought together to reveal that these dualities could be transcended by unity, as represented by the circle. Finally, a yin-yang would be painted on the back, which would be flipped over at the end of the narrative epic.

DSC_2828The yin-yang symbol of the flip side of the murals after completion during our final exam period.

Script for the Community Gathering

While students worked on these murals during the next four class periods, I developed a narrative that would demonstrate moving from dualism to non-dualism. I wrote the script as a modern midrash on the Genesis 1 creation story. [Scroll down to the addendum to see the complete script.] To begin the gathering, one of the students read an introduction:

“Today we continue our yearlong theme of unity.  All religions suggest that Ultimate Reality is one, and we as humans want to be one with that reality.  Some religions call that reality dharma, Kingdom of God, Shalom, the Middle Way, or emptiness. Today we will offer you a multitude of words, images, and music about unity beyond separation.  But we offer you a word of caution.  These concepts are difficult to understand. You will need to think hard to get a glimpse.”

Next, with ethereal music from Mannheim Steamroller’s “Sky” playing in the background, I (sitting off-stage) began to recite the creation story:

“This is the story of how God created the heavens, the earth, and mature, thoughtful people.  In the beginning the earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God was moving on the face of the waters.” One of my students, Charmaine, served as a narrative counterpoint on-stage. She followed: “And God said, ‘Let there be light,’ and there was light.  And God saw that the light was good, and separated the light from the darkness.”

I then continued: “This Great Separation brought a change of cosmic proportions to the earth – a multitude of opposites appeared on earth for the first time.” Gender muralAt this point, all 19 students from our class (plus a few additional stand-ins to get up to the required 24) walked onto a large, 30 x 24 foot black-white cloth, which symbolized dualism. Students were dressed all in black or in white, again to demonstrate the theme of dualism. In 12 rows lined up on the boundary between the black and white cloth, pairs of students held the mural at waist level. The first pair was male and female. The narrator read: ‘Male says to female: ‘I, who live as a man among men, realize that the world is made by men for men.'” As this was being read, the “positive” pole student representing “maleness,” took control of the mural, mimed victory and circled, holding the mural above her head, while the losing “negative” pole student symbolizing “femaleness” slumped to defeat onto the black-white cloth. This continued through the remaining 11 pairs, leaving 12 murals circling triumphantly around the perimeter of the black-white cloth, while by contrast the losing pairs sat head-down and dejected in a circle.

With dualism now firmly established, the narrative moved to calling such dichotomies into question. Four humanities teachers each played the role of a prophet who suggested a better way: Ken Wilber, Jesus, a Taoist farmer, and the Buddha. The sudden appearance of familiar faces in culturally appropriate garb playing prophetic roles (e.g., a Christian teacher as a Jewish peasant; a Korean teacher as a Chinese farmer, etc) within an otherwise majestic creation story genre brought a crescendo of laughter from students. Each speaker challenged the conventional belief that one half of the pair (e.g., Westerners, life, riches, etc) was superior to the other half (e.g., Asians, death, and poverty). Then borrowing from the Gospel of Thomas saying 22, all four sages, seated respectively at the four corners of the black-white cloth, announced in unison:

Wilber: When you make the two one,

Jesus: and when you make the inside like the outside and the outside like the inside,

Taoist farmer: and the above like the below,

Buddha: and when you make the male and the female one and the same,

Wilber: then will you enter the kingdom.

Jesus: There is no rich or poor,

Taoist farmer: slave nor free,

Buddha: male or female,

All together: ALL ARE ONE.”

In the final part of the drama, all the students around and within the black-white cloth, now playing the role of the crowd, responded to these prophetic proclamations by demanding to know how to live out this non-dualistic perspective.  Because no further words could adequately answer this most practical of questions, the narrators and actors went silent and the “Sky” theme returned. The Buddha escorted a “good” student carrying her mural of good triumphing over evil over to the seated, dejected “bad” student, bringing them together; they then carried their mural together to the center of the cloth. Next, as DSC_2792the other 11 pairs followed, the 12 murals were placed together, and for the first time the line linking all the murals appeared. Then to make the unity more explicit, one of the students, Megan, placed a yellow ribbon on the line. The ribbon was then passed from person to person, completing the circle. From among all the dualistic elements a unity emerged, symbolized by the yellow ribbon. Finally, after a 5-second pause, the twelve panels were flipped over and a large black-white yin yang emerged.

murals with ribbonPracticing the final part of our story before the gathering: using a yellow ribbon to symbolize unity in the midst of the diversity of our experiences.

To bring the story to a conclusion, I spoke as I emerged from behind the bleachers , walking towards Charmaine: “And God saw the heavens, the earth, and the now mature, thoughtful people and said, Charmaine then commented, “Well done, good and faithful servants, for the two have become one, the inside is like the outside and the outside is like the inside.”  Then as Charmaine and I stood at the podium, together we said, “We do not fear death or darkness or poverty, for in the unity of my people, My presence is made known.” DSC_2801Bill Leese, director of our Community Gatherings, follows up our drama with the next part of the gathering focusing on the yin-yang symbol on the gym floor.

Student Learning

Following the Community Gathering, which received relatively good reviews from faculty and students, I wanted to know what my World Religion students had truly learned from our preparation and performance. While we all felt positive about the gathering, I had real reservations that the learning would not be commensurate with the eight class periods, representing about 20% of the total semester class time, that we had spent prepping for the event. I asked the students to write a blog entry reflecting on what they had learned. I was quite relieved to read the blog entries, many of which revealed valuable learning. I include some exemplary examples of what students felt that they had learned. Jamie summarizes in detail what many students took away from our study of non-dualism, which was not to avoid the things that we fear most in our lives.

Jamie: Before we began preparing for the community gathering in religion class, I sawJamie the world in opposites with one side more superior to the other. I was one of the ones who “affirmed the truth that being rich is better than being poor, being beautiful is better than being ugly, being free is better than being enslaved”. After all, that’s what we have been taught all our lives. But after we started getting into the topic of dualism and how the world shouldn’t dwell on opposites, I realized that the world isn’t just 9 Me and Youblack and white. I understood that nothing is plainly better than it’s “opposite”, that sometimes they are one and the same. Another thing I learned from this is that we shouldn’t necessarily aim for the “better” side of the dualistic idea and avoid the “weaker” side of the idea. We have all been brought up to aspire to be rich and avoid becoming poor. We never realized that “the firmer one’s boundaries, the more entrenched are one’s battles”. We have all over time began to fear becoming poor, becoming enslaved, and becoming dead. After preparing for this gathering, I slowly came to terms with my dread of the “lesser” half of any dualistic idea. This gathering has not only helped me not view the world in a dualistic way, but also helped me not fear death or the darkness. Most profoundly, Jamie’s non-dualism even extends to re-conceptualizing death as part of life. Charmaine and Mr. S in art room Charmaine (pictured above), who was most closely involved in all aspects of the production, gained new spiritual insights through this experience.

Charmaine: It’s a human tendency to try and search for the “good things” to do with each of the topics, e.g. get more material things, boost your reputation, do pleasurable actions, and try to get praise, but try and avoid the opposite “bad things”. What I learned from this was that for each of the “good things” and each of the “bad things” have their own “good thing” and “bad thing”. For example, the “good thing” of reputation is having a good reputation, and having a good reputation has its own good and bad. The good thing is that people look up to you and you have the power to influence others/ others will listen to you; the bad thing is that you will focus so much on your reputation and lose other opportunities to do good things as well as you may become proud/ overbearing. The good thing of having a bad reputation is that you will be humbled and you may find out more about your true self. What we showed in the gathering was that you need a balance of both to find the middle way of the two dualistic themes in order to gain the most and to find peace. The more you gain one side, the more you dread the other and the more suffering you get. What I got from this was that more extreme you are on one side, the more unhappy/ agitated you will be because dualism is like a balance. That is why we try and find the middle because when you’re equally balanced between both, you will have balance and peace. You won’t be attached to what humans think of as good (e.g. wealthy) and be unsettled by the “spiritual” loss (being too prideful). DSC_2747 Jocelyn’s comments focus on the concept of the “Middle Way.”

Jocelyn (to the right in picture above): Despite all these opposites, I think the most important part is finding the “Middle Way”. One concept that helped me understand this was the concept of rich and poor. Mr. Schmidt said that once you start earning more than $75,000 per year, then you won’t be achieving ultimate happiness. The richest people one Earth aren’t the happiest people on Earth, because they tend to work so hard that they feel stressed and unhappy. However, if you find the “Middle Way”, not working too hard but yet making enough money to support your family, then you will achieve the ultimate happiness. A quote from the script helps support this idea: “Happy people do not seek anything, nor fear nothing. They cling to nothing!” I think finding the “Middle Way” would certainly help with this idea. Overall, I’m really glad our class got a chance to learn about dualism/non-dualism through artwork. The favorite line for students in the epic story was the succinct conclusion, “Eliminate boundaries, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, Empty yourself of attachment to all outcomes and Cling to nothing.” Here are two student reflections on the meaning of this summary comment.

Jay: There are moments in life where you find that everything is connected, or jay leeintertwined. I realized this while learning about non-duality. When we first learned about ‘self transcendency’, I couldn’t quite grasp the meaning of it. I knew it was to be compassionate to other people. However, I could not understand how one could do this, to put someone else’s life ahead of their own. But while learning about dualism I realized that self transcendency is not something that only benefits other people other than yourself. Everything is intertwined. By being compassionate to other people, that person may be getting benefits, but you will also gain happiness which cannot be achieved in any other way. The quotes “When you are happy, it makes me happy” from the Music video ‘What about me?” really describes this well. Further more, the quote, ‘Eliminate boundaries, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, Empty yourself of attachment to all outcomes and Cling to nothing’ all spoke to me. I could really feel the power that it withheld. It is in fact the solution for happiness . . . . It really helped to bring everything together from multiple puzzle pieces to one whole big picture. DSC_2785

Elizabeth (pictured with Jocelyn in the picture above): These are all stereotypes that are causing problems and have caused problems. We need to take away those boundaries that separate us from each other. Why can’t we embrace the differences in our world? The community gathering answered my question: “Eliminate boundaries, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, empty yourself of attachment to all outcomes, cling to nothing.” Finally, two students, one a Christian boy and the other a Jewish girl, had moments of insight that occurred during the performance itself. DSC_2789

Eugene: Participating in the high school gathering was a eugenelot of fun for me and while we prepared for the big event, I feel like I have learned a lot . . .  If we didn’t do this gathering and learned about different religions instead, I wouldn’t understand what we covered about the dualistic world which is to me, the most important thing we’ve learned this semester so far. It helped me to understand my view of what the world is like. I always had the view of one is better than the other and the two will always be segregated, but now I realize that they are always made into one. Making visuals of dualism was definitely helpful to help me understand all the different types. As we practiced for the gathering, I got a good look at all of them and understood how the two differ but can be together.
I found this quote very inspiring. “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ 44 But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.” Although I have heard the first part many times, I understood what it really meant for the first time when it was said at the gathering. I know it will take me a very long time for me to learn to try to give my enemies a chance and pray for them, but when Mr. Leese said it, I was encouraged to take a shot. In conclusion, this gathering was my favorite part of religion this semester and I will probably remember it for the rest of my life. DSC_2742 Megan (pictured above to the left): Finally, in the meditation, I really relaxed. I was stressed by the idea of performing in front of my peers, and I knew that our message was a lot to get across in on simple gathering. During the meditation, I let that stress go, but instead of trying to focus on nothing, I focused on everything. I imagined connections, like bands of light, going out from me to everyone else first in the room, then in HKIS, then in Hong Kong, and the in the world. It felt like I was zooming out on the big picture, realizing that we’re all connected. I don’t often get this feeling, seeing as our world has issues from global warming and genocides, to homework and exams. However, at that moment, I felt calm, letting the energy of everyone and everything flow through me.

Such flashes of insight are not what most of us expect from a modern education, even a religion class. However, as David Frawley has written in “The Culture of Ritual and the Quest for Enlightenment,” perhaps this is a missing ingredient in adolescent development:

Rituals are of special importance for young people, who need not only social bonding but bonding with the world of nature and spiritual reality in order to discover who they really are.  Otherwise, young people feel alienated and out of harmony with life. Lack of meaningful ritual is surely a factor in the high rate of crime, depression, and suicide among the young. To restore the science of ritual is thus a spiritual and psychological endeavor of the highest order. It is one of the challenges of the coming millennia. Ritual creates the structure that sustains our personal and collective lives.

When powerful ideas, ritual action, and concentration are brought together, humans naturally make connections beyond themselves and experience wholeness. Eugene and Megan both experienced something powerful during the performance itselt. While not every student had learned to explain concepts of dualism and non-dualism accurately, I was pleased that most students came to have some grasp of these fairly complex ideas. And everyone, even those unable to clearly articulate what they had learned, seemed to sense that we had taken on a worthy subject. Finally, it was evident that class morale as well as individual relationships had been strengthened through our performance. This reinforced the importance of social relationships in the learning process for high school students.

Conclusion

I am quite pleased with this pedagogical experiment which combined a complex religious concept with artistic expression and performance. My learnings from this pedagogical experiment are:

  1. Students want to be challenged by ‘big ideas’ like non-dualism.
  2. In particular, international students, who are aware of similarities among different cultural groups, are attracted to the concept of non-dualism.
  3. Artwork is a form of spiritual practice that engages students’ religious imaginations. Relying on symbolism, the creation of artistic pieces can be an especially effective way to help students understand sophisticated religious concepts.
  4. Both the processing of doing artwork and then sharing this work through public performance builds a sense of class community that can be central to the learning process of high school students.
  5. Students want to “do” religion more than simply talk about it.  Artwork and dramatic performances which students invest in with their own creativity and meaning draw forth new personal insights.

For many years I have been experimenting with secular and Christian rituals, hoping that these would provide students with something that is missing in their modern life experience. This entire activity of creating a Community Gathering performance was personally engaging and professionally rewarding, and one that I hope to repeat with classes in the future.

References

Bond, A. (2005). “HH the Dalai Lama on the 8 worldly concerns. Accesed on December 26, 2012 at http://www.care2.com/greenliving/dalai-lama-8-worldly-concerns.html

Bourgeault, C. (2004).Centering prayer and inner awakening. Lanham, MD: Cowley.

Frawley, D. (1994). “The culture of ritual and the quest for enlightenment.” The Quest (summer). Accessed on December 26, 2012 at http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/tib/ritual.htm Wilber, K. (2001). No boundary. Boston: Shambala

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Addendum: Script for Community Gathering

Introduction: “Today we continue our yearlong theme of unity.  All religions suggest that Ultimate Reality is one, and we as humans want to be one with that reality.  Some religions call that reality dharma, Kingdom of God, Shalom, the Middle Way, or emptiness. Today we will offer you a multitude of words, images, and music about unity beyond separation.  But we offer you a word of caution.  These concepts are difficult to understand. You will need to think hard to get a glimpse.”

Narrator (Mr. Schmidt off stage): This is the story of how God created the heavens, the earth, and mature, thoughtful people.  In the beginning the earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God was moving on the face of the waters. [All people and panels lay on the floor scattered about, and people lying down.]

Charmaine (at podium): And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.  And God saw that the light was good, and separated the light from the darkness.

Narrator: This Great Separation brought a change of cosmic proportions to the earth – a multitude of opposites appeared on earth for the first time. [The two “positive” of the two pairs line up in order holding their art work at waist level.  As each phrase is read, the “positive” celebrates by holding up their mural, while the “negative” pair slumps to the floor in a circle with head down] Narrator & Charmaine read:

Narrator(1) Male says to female: “I, who live as a man among men, realize that the world is made by men for men.”

Charmaine: (2) Life says to death: ““YOLO” “Carpe Diem” “Seize the Day”

Narrator: (3) Peace says to conflict: “Don’t fight the system – conform and there will be peace.”

Charmaine: (4) “Light skin says to dark skin: My race is superior to yours.”

Narrator: (5) Rich says to poor: “The Almighty Dollar”

Charmaine: (6) Beauty says to uglyness: “Come, O radiant light, make the darkness flee.”

Narrator: (7) Freedom says to slavery: “Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty I’m free at last.”

Charmaine: (8) Fullness says to emptiness: Fill life to the fullest.

Narrator: (9)Me says to You: “What about me?”

Charmaine: (10) Overweight Says to Malnutrition: “Plenty is better than scarcity.”

Narrator: (11) Good says to evil: “Return to the pits of hell.”

Charmaine: (12) “Light Says to Dark: “Do not go gentle into that good night, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

Narrator: And the people who heard these things all affirmed the truth that being rich is better than being poor, being beautiful is better than being ugly, being free is better than being enslaved. [All those holding posters rest them on the floor and listen. Then they all nod to each other when narrator says that the philosopher spoke wisely.]

Charmaine: And for a long time, the people lived by this belief until one day a wise man among the people spoke to them all.

Mr. Kersten as a philosopher: All these opposites are separated by boundaries.  Anyone can see that over time every boundary becomes a battle line. The firmer one’s boundaries, the more entrenched are one’s battles. The more I hold onto pleasure, the more I necessarily fear pain. The more I pursue goodness, the more I am obsessed with evil. The more I seek success, the more I must dread failure. The harder I cling to life, the more terrifying death becomes. The more I value anything, the more obsessed I become with its loss.

Narrator: When he finished, all the people agreed that he spoke wisely.  But now the people were confused and murmered.  [Poster-holding students all nod and agree together.

Charmaine: Then among them a certain Jewish peasant appeared saying,

Mr. Leese as Jesus: “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighborand hate your enemy.’ 44 But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.

Narrator: A new thought: God doesn’t just love the good people, and hate the evil people; he loves all people.

Charmaine: Then a certain Chinese peasant appeared.

Mr. Suh: I am a poor farmer in China. I have one precious possession: a horse. One day the horse ran away, and my neighbors come to me, they tell me, “Ah, such bad fortune!” But I say to them, “Why you think this is bad fortune?” A month later, the horse came back—and she bring with her two beautiful horses. The neighbors were happy, they tell me, “Ah, such good fortune! Such beautiful horses!” But I say to them, “Why you think this is good fortune?” Then my son, he fall from the horse, and he break his leg. The neighbors were very, very sad. They tell me, “Such bad fortune!” But I say to them, “Why you think this is bad fortune?” Then there is a war, and every healthy young man, they go fight and they all die. 全部死咗. But my son, he have a broken leg, so he stay home. The neighbors, they tell me, “Such good fortune!” And I say to them, “Why you think this is good fortune? Why? Why why tell me why.”

Narrator: A new thought: Good fortune and bad are difficult to determine.

Charmaine: Then a certain Indian prince appeared saying:

Mr. Ferrin: Do not seek riches, but also do not avoid poverty. Do not seek to be praised, but also do not avoid criticism. Do not seek a good reputation, but also do not avoid a bad reputation.

Narrator: A new thought: Happy people do not seek anything, nor fear anything. They cling to nothing!

Narrator: Some of the people were confused and others intrigued, saying,

Whole Group: What does this mean?  I don’t understand.

Charmaine: This is a new teaching. We have never heard anything like this. What does this mean?

Narrator: And then the philosopher, Jesus, the Chinese farmer, and the Buddha spoke:

Kersten: When you make the two one,

Leese: and when you make the inside like the outside and the outside like the inside,

Suh: and the above like the below,

Ferrin: and when you make the male and the female one and the same,

Kersten: then will you enter the kingdom.

Leese: There is no rich or poor,

Suh: slave nor free, Ferrin: male or female,

All together: ALL ARE ONE.”

Narrator: The people responded, “Dear wise ones, we implore you,  tell us, how do we make the two one?

Charmaine: How do we make the inside like the outside and the outside like the inside? How?

Whole Group: How, how, how?”

Narrator: And the wise thinkers said:

Mr. Kersten: Eliminate boundaries.

Mr. Leese: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.

Mr. Suh: Empty yourself of attachment to all outcomes.

Mr. Ferrin: Cling to nothing.

Narrator: And the people cried,

Charmaine: “These are beautiful words, but we do not understand.  Speak plainly, for we are simple people.  “How can we understand? How?

Whole Group: How? How? How?

Mr. Kersten: “We can not tell you how . . . “

Mr. Leese: “For this is the great mystery of the ages.”

Mr. Suh: “But we can show you how!”

Mr. Ferrin “Here’s how. “Sky” by Mannheim Steamroller music: 2:10-2:50 as the Buddha leads “good” to cooperate with “evil.” Dualities begin working together and all the mural come together.

Narrator (emerges): And God saw the heavens, the earth, and the now mature, thoughtful people and said,

Charmaine: “Well done, good and faithful servants, for the two have become one, the inside is like the outside and the outside is like the inside.

Narrator & Charmaine at podium: We do not fear death or darkness or poverty, for in the unity of my people, My presence is made known. DSC_2836

About martinschmidtinasia

I have served as a humanities teacher at Hong Kong International School since 1990, teaching history, English, and religion courses. Since the mid-1990's I have also come to assume responsibility for many of the school's service learning initiatives. My position also includes human care ministry with the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod in Hong Kong, southern China, and others parts of Asia. Bringing my affluent students into contact with people served by the LCMS in Asia has proved to be beneficial to students and our community partners alike. Through these experience I have become committed to social conscience education, which gives students the opportunity to find their place in society in the context of challenging global realities.
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